Adlestrop

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 11th of June 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

On the 24th of June 1914 the poet, Edward Thomas, was on a train to visit fellow poet Robert Frost, when the train made an unscheduled stop at Adlestrop station in Gloucestershire. Thomas recorded notes of the brief visit and the words went on to form the poem Adlestrop, voted in the top 20 British poems ever to be written.

The poem has been compared to the works of Elgar and Henry V’s speech before the Battle of Agincourt and has been described as everything that is typically English.

If you have difficulty listening to the show, a text version of the poem is included after the soundbar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats press the arrow to the left of the soundbar below.

 

 

Adlestrop

Yes. I remember Adlestrop—

The name, because one afternoon

Of heat the express-train drew up there

Unwontedly. It was late June.

 

The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat.

No one left and no one came

On the bare platform. What I saw

Was Adlestrop—only the name

 

And willows, willow-herb, and grass,

And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry,

No whit less still and lonely fair

Than the high cloudlets in the sky.

 

And for that minute a blackbird sang

Close by, and round him, mistier,

Farther and farther, all the birds

Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

 

Edward Thomas.

 

Sometimes

Sometimes

Hot Summer Night

Hot Summer Night

Butterflies

Butterflies

Summer

Summer

Poetic Beats is taking a break for a few weeks to recharge the batteries. We will be back on Friday the 15th of June 2018. Today is the first day of the meteorological Summer in the UK, let’s hope it is a good one.

Above and Below

Above and Below (1)

From a Railway Carriage

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 21st May 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

Today’s poem, From a Railway Carriage, written by Robert Louis Stevenson, is a poem many readers may remember from their schooldays. The poem is written in a form and style evoking the feeling of being onboard a moving train. Robert Louis Stevenson was more famously known for his literary classics, Treasure Island, Kidnapped and the Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, but wrote many poems. From a Railway Carriage appeared in his collection of children’s poetry titled, A Children’s Garden of Verse, published in 1885.

If you have difficulty listening to the show, a text version of the poem is included after the soundbar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats press the arrow to the left of the soundbar below.

 

 

From a Railway Carriage

 

Faster than fairies, faster than witches,

Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;

And charging along like troops in a battle,

All through the meadows the horses and cattle:

All of the sights of the hill and the plain

Fly as thick as driving rain;

And ever again, in the wink of an eye,

Painted stations whistle by.

 

Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,

All by himself and gathering brambles;

Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;

And there is the green for stringing the daisies!

Here is a cart run away in the road

Lumping along with man and load;

And here is a mill and there is a river:

Each a glimpse and gone for ever!

 

Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Pedestal

Pedestal

Trainspotting

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 14th of May 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

We continue this month’s theme of trains with a poem by Davy D called Trainspotting. The poem describes the experience of waiting for a train at Haddenham and Thame Parkway railway station and how doing something different, like not getting on the train, can help break habit and provide a different experience for poetry.

If you have difficulty listening to the show a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Trainspotting

 

Neon shadows follow across

a deserted platform as

November’s wind rattles

the corrugated shelter.

Inside, blue and yellow shout

Oxford to London

disturbing an empty coke can.

 

Between the swoosh of

electronic doors, eyes in

love’s first bloom. Business

suits and trainers striding

for pole position; muted

conversation rising above

a now constant whirr.

 

Apple Macs open.

Samsung and Sony

compete for trade.

Pen and paper lay

out battle lines.

 

The train now arriving at platform 2.

 

Blurs of black, grey and

blue charge the doors,

frenzied moments en-route

to final pay slips. Madness

limping to a bleak horizon,

leaving solitude and

silence to be reconciled.

 

© Davy D 2018

Karma

Karma