Cowes To Coniston

Cowes to Coniston

Image: Freeimages.com

It is that time of year when Inside the Mind of Davy D is feeling a bit like sawdust and time to take a break and recharge the batteries. For the next three weeks I will be wandering around the Isle of Wight and the Lake District having a bit of rest, recuperation and a search for more poetry.

There will be no more posts until Monday the 23rd April 2018, but please do feel free to peruse the site. I will still be popping in on your blogs and reading all your excellent stuff (WiFi permitting) and leave these excellent words from Buddha to dwell on.

” Your work is to discover your world and then with all your heart give yourself to it.”

Spring Haiku

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 26th March 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

In this episode we take a trip over to Japan and examine a form of poetry that has caused much debate in the poetry world, the Haiku.  The Japanese Haiku Master Matsuo Basho spent a lifetime travelling and mastering the form we see and value today.  Davy D’s poem, Spring Haiku reflects the spirit of haiku poetry and written using the Western style of the format.

Poetic Beats is taking a break for a few weeks and will back on Friday the 27th of April 2018.

If you have difficulty listening to the broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Spring Haiku.

 

To the untrained eye

The haiku masks with its form

And simplicity.

 

Three lines from “The Now”

a key enabling nature’s

box to be opened.

 

Take Spring for instance.

A winter beast ushered back

To hibernation.

 

Dawn sunlight falling

On the Ridgeway, bringing a

Spine to daffodils.

 

Deep undercover,

the heron set in stillness,

waiting for movement,

 

distracted only

by mirrored ripples and duck’s

chaotic landings.

 

 

And in the distance

Rooked woodlands calling out to

the shadowed walker.

 

It’s mysterious

The paths we will walk and the

Poems we will write

 

And read, hoping to

uncover answers to life

and her quandaries.

 

© Davy D 2018

 

Say No To Clowns

Red Nose Day

What are your thoughts on clowns?

I love clowns and still remember feelings of excitement when, as a young child, the circus rolled into town. Sitting at the ringside watching them with their large feet and red noses, driving square wheeled cars and wetting audiences with their buckets of confetti. What more could a young boy ask for?

Clowns appear to be having a hard time at the moment with movies like Stephen King’s “It” and the series, American Horror Story. But relax you Coulrophics out there, today’s post isn’t about the joy of clowns, it’s the opposite and a journey Down Under to one of my favourite places on the internet, the “Say No To Clowns” blog, written and hosted by the talented Vanessa.

Some of you may already be aware of Vanessa’s blog, but for those of you who haven’t been there it is well worth a visit. Her self-description of being, “just a girl standing in front of a salad, asking it to be a donut,” gives you an insight of the humour, mind bendiness (is this a real word) and talent on offer with Vanessa’s brand of writing and poetry.

What I love about her work is she squeezes every ounce out of a post and the title, tags, art, music and writing all come together to give your brain a good workout. Vanessa’s poetry is the kind you need to sit with for a few days and her posts always draw you back looking for another clue or another piece of the jigsaw. For an old Detective they are a blessing, a bit like pulling the pieces together in a complicated case.

I could go on all day about Vanessa and her writing, but rather than wasting time reading me blabbering on why not pay her blog a visit and discover the magic yourself.

Here’s the link – Say No To Clowns– have a great Thursday.

Down Under

Down Under

Isolation

Isolation

Poetic Motivations:85

Poetic Motivations_85

The First Spring Day

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 19th March 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

On the last day of astronomical Winter, and the eve of Spring and the Vernal (Spring) Equinox, we read and examine the poem, The First Spring Day by Christina Rossetti.

The Spring Equinox has long been celebrated as a time of rebirth in the Northern Hemisphere and there are many festivals welcoming the first day of Spring. In Iran, the equinox marks the start of Nowruz, the Persian New Year, and the festival of Khooneh Takouni, (shaking the house down), where two weeks of spring cleaning gets the new year underway.

If you have difficulty listening to the broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this week’s episode of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

 

The First Spring Day

 

I wonder if the sap is stirring yet,

If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate,

If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun

And crocus fires are kindling one by one:

        Sing, robin, sing!

I still am sore in doubt concerning Spring.

 

I wonder if the spring-tide of this year

Will bring another Spring both lost and dear;

If heart and spirit will find out their Spring,

Or if the world alone will bud and sing:

        Sing, hope, to me!

Sweet notes, my hope, soft notes for memory.

 

The sap will surely quicken soon or late,

The tardiest bird will twitter to a mate;

So Spring must dawn again with warmth and bloom,

Or in this world, or in the world to come:

        Sing, voice of Spring!

Till I too blossom and rejoice and sing.

 

Christina Rossetti

Are Poets Just Lazy Writers?

Are Poets Just Lazy Writers_

Thank you all for taking part in last week’s post, Even Poets Can Be Funny. Your responses kept me smiling well into the weekend. Mrs D got in the act suggesting my humour was like me, best kept in a MOOseum. Hopefully we can have a few more posts like this throughout the year.

In today’s Thursday Thoughts I am returning to the exploration and journey through poetry and a question asked at a writing meetup I attended a few weeks ago, “are poets just lazy writers?” My first reaction was to go on the defensive, but I took the question home with me and it has opened some interesting ideas and reflection.

Poetry can appear, from the outside, to be a writing form taking less time and effort than other types of writing. Compare, for example, one of Issa’s Haikus with Tolstoy’s War and Peace and the finished work on paper can lead to the impression poetry is a less time consuming and challenging activity.

At the same meeting I was asked, “How long does it take you to write a poem?” My answer was “55 years…. at the moment”, because each poem I write contains every ounce of my being going back to the time I took my first breath. This would be no different whether writing a novel, short story or a six-line poem.

Sometimes an idea for a poem can sit in my head for weeks and only after a hundred miles of walking and pondering will the first draft make it on paper. Then there is the drawn-out process of reducing the 1000 words of mayhem into something resembling poetry.  Many poems are put to one side in journals or files and may not see the light of day for months or even years.  In among all this there are the hours of doubt and frustration and a process that may be taking place with numerous poems at any one time. There are many words I could use to describe poets but lazy would not be one of them.

C.K. Williams said  his poem, The Hearth (in the singing), took twenty-five years to write and there are many other poets whose poetry and collections were the product of years of hard work.  Each one an example  poets are far from lazy writers.

Well that’s enough for this week. I have had my daily ten minutes of stretching the pen and grey matter; the log fire and armchair beckons (it’s a poet thing).

What are your views on this. Are poets lazy writers, or is there much more to the dark art? The floor is yours.

Searching

Searching

Volcano

Volcano