On Vacation

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Photo Credit: Davy D

It’s holiday time and me and Mrs D are off to the Baltic for some relaxation and recuperation.

Inside The Mind Of Davy D will be back on the 24th July 2018 and Poetic Beats will return on the 27th July 2018.

Enjoy the warm weather.

Emily Dickinson

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D recorded on the 25th of June 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

Emily Dickinson is considered to be one of the greatest poets to emerge from the USA. It wasn’t until after her death in 1886, when over 1800 of her poems were discovered, that her real genius came to prominence. On this show we read and discuss her poem Summer Showers and look into why she still has an influence in the study and development of poetry.

If you have difficulty listening to this broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the soundbar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats, press the arrow to the left of the soundbar below.

 

 

Summer Shower

A drop fell on the apple tree,

Another on the roof;

A half a dozen kissed the eaves,

And made the gables laugh.

 

A few went out to help the brook,

That went to help the sea.

Myself conjectured, Were they pearls,

What necklaces could be!

 

The dust replaced in hoisted roads,

The birds jocoser sung;

The sunshine threw his hat away,

The orchards spangles hung.

 

The breezes brought dejected lutes,

And bathed them in the glee;

The East put out a single flag,

And signed the fete away.

 

Emily Dickinson.

The Space Between Trees

The Space Between Trees

Summer Loving

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 18th of June 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

In a survey conducted in 2008, talking about the weather came top of the 50 typical traits of the British. It seems at any moment in the UK at least a third of the population is either talking about the weather, has already done so, or is about to do so.  Today’s poem, Summer Loving, takes a contemporary look at Summer and the behaviour of the British.  The following discussion reveals why weather talk is more than just inane banter.

If you have difficulty listening to the show, a text version of the poem is included after the soundbar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats, press the arrow to the left of the soundbar below.

 

 

Summer Loving

 

From Solstice to Equinox,

one hundred and thirty-two

days of weathered obsession,

searching for nimbostratus.

 

Burnt skin and sneezes,

accompany backdrops of

beach life, as vanilla ice cream

drips from oyster shells among

 

wafts of Factor 20. Bodies

measured over shadowed

feet in the ebb and flow

of afternoon tides.

 

When the sun comes,

we pray for rain.

When the rain comes,

we pray for sun,

 

heading for hibernation in

a three-season mourning.

 

© Davy D 2018

 

Poetry Section

Poetry Section

Adlestrop

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 11th of June 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

On the 24th of June 1914 the poet, Edward Thomas, was on a train to visit fellow poet Robert Frost, when the train made an unscheduled stop at Adlestrop station in Gloucestershire. Thomas recorded notes of the brief visit and the words went on to form the poem Adlestrop, voted in the top 20 British poems ever to be written.

The poem has been compared to the works of Elgar and Henry V’s speech before the Battle of Agincourt and has been described as everything that is typically English.

If you have difficulty listening to the show, a text version of the poem is included after the soundbar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats press the arrow to the left of the soundbar below.

 

 

Adlestrop

Yes. I remember Adlestrop—

The name, because one afternoon

Of heat the express-train drew up there

Unwontedly. It was late June.

 

The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat.

No one left and no one came

On the bare platform. What I saw

Was Adlestrop—only the name

 

And willows, willow-herb, and grass,

And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry,

No whit less still and lonely fair

Than the high cloudlets in the sky.

 

And for that minute a blackbird sang

Close by, and round him, mistier,

Farther and farther, all the birds

Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

 

Edward Thomas.

 

Sometimes

Sometimes

Hot Summer Night

Hot Summer Night

Butterflies

Butterflies

Summer

Summer

Poetic Beats is taking a break for a few weeks to recharge the batteries. We will be back on Friday the 15th of June 2018. Today is the first day of the meteorological Summer in the UK, let’s hope it is a good one.