Lists

Lists

Image Credit: Freeimages.com

Lists

keep

us

on

our

toes

cognitive

workouts

for

golden

age

woes

Β© Davy D 2017

49 Comments

πŸ™‚ No, Davy, it’s not your age. Your head is full of poetry, which is so much better than fluff. P.S. A 136 line Haiku is headed your way by the weekend.

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Oh no, I meant 136 “syllable” Haiku. What was that you said about “golden age woes”? A fun poem–and I totally identify.

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What a great form for a poem! Even I could take to this.

On another note, I do love a good list.

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I LOVE this, Davy!! And it even rhymes–way to go!! πŸ™‚

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    Thank you RL. My reputation is in tatters. It will keep the poetry police at bay for a while πŸ™‚

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      You’re most welcome, Davy–but if UK detectives pride themselves as ours do, “no case without a conviction is ever completely closed”; as long as a prime suspect is at large, somewhere there’s a justice-hungry, driven, obsessed cop-with-no-life who just won’t let it go…you can run, tattered poet, but you can’t hide forever….(wicked vengeful laugh).

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      We are like dogs with bones RL πŸ™‚

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      Truly–and that’s not always a bad thing! πŸ™‚

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      It is when you start biting your own bones RL πŸ™‚

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      Yeah…that’s not good…

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      PS–lately I’ve been watching some new “true-crime/detective” programs we have here, which detail the experiences and deep impact of some cases on featured detectives (retired). It’s been very interesting, often moving to see these tough grizzly men choke up, years later, about certain cases/victims/survivors. It seems that many have finally laid down their defensive machismo to reveal the marshmallow center of their hearts–sometimes with a still sheepish smile. Great stories, very humanizing in our current negative atmosphere/attitude toward law enforcement folk here… One season’s final episode last night was almost grueling to watch: the retired homicide detective is African American and he opens each episode by saying “Murder chose me”–because when he was very young, his mother was murdered (case unsolved), and later his brother was also murdered. So his quest is passionate and personal, to solve every homicide case (I don’t recall specific figures, but both his confessions and convictions rates were very high). Anyhow–this last episode dealt with him going back to find the answers to his mother’s murder. It was horrifying to me, to learn that at the time of her murder, it was not considered a criminal offense to kill a wife for “suspected” infidelity; and that a Black woman in particular, was really a non-person, not worthy of “justice”. Add to that, her husband who had killed her, was familiar to local police–so their attitude toward him was, “let’s see how we can spin this story to help you out”. Fast forward in time, the man was imprisoned for a separate crime–where the featured detective met with him…finally getting the answers to his life-long mystery. And if all this was not dramatic enough, the ending impacted me greatly: he said he realized his mother, during the short time he had with her, had implanted in him the gift of a great well of forgiveness…for, having forgiven the man who’d killed her, he now knew he could forgive anybody. And one more thing–up to that point, he had no pictures of his mother, could not really remember what she looked like; and part of his searching the case file, had been to hopefully obtain a photo. There was not one in the file. But later on, someone sent him a photo–and that is the closure he truly needed. Amazing heart-stuff.

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      Heart wrenching RL. I am glad he found some closure with his journey. There are so many people, working in these kind of professions, who are left to carry the pain and horror without any help and assistance.

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      Yes, you’re right–and I wonder, are they just not seeking help, or is it really in short supply? I worked very very briefly for a local police dept, and although they had a dept psychiatrist, I never heard of anyone going to see him–but it seemed like everyone needed to! For a small dept, with relatively little serious crime–the whole place was dysfunctional from the chief of down. I was just a lowly clerk matron (the matron part was in case a female was brought to the jail overnight…what a mess)–anyway, I only lasted 5 months. It’s a tough profession, and I kind of think some counseling should be mandatory–just my opinion πŸ™‚

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      In the UK RL the counselling experience was a bit going through the motions and ticking boxes. I think a lot of officers don’t start to let things go until after they have left the job.

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      I suspect you’re right, Davy–once they’ve left the job, they don’t have to worry that admitting their emotional issues might impact their goals for promotion. Sad state of affairs, reality. The cost to health and relationships is extremely high–substance abuse, divorce, suicides. Very distressing.

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Aww, I agree with Laura. Your head is full of poetry. You can’t help it if you forget a few things​ here and there πŸ™‚

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Well done and clever. I got a chuckle out the list and the “rob the bank” item. Perhaps, your piggy bank and not the bank down the street? πŸ™‚

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I love this! And I love how you wrote the actual poem like a list. Very creative.

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Really like that. I don’t really like lists but I find they are becoming a necessity.

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Couldn’t help but giggle…when I was younger, I never made a list. Great poem… πŸ™‚

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I like lists – lists jump start journalling.

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lists make me happy! knowing I am on track and looking back at progress made. simple but sound words Davy. liked it very much!

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oh i am obsessed with lists. hehe. love the cascade!

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Fun poem! I quite enjoyed it. At sixty, I’ve taken to making lists, too. Time was when I could keep it all in my head. “Never more!” Quoth the Raven.

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