Hit The North

Hit The North

23 Comments

This is good stuff Davy hooked me from the start. Whether intended or not, I’m thinking of a North that’s been stereotyped, and a feeling that Gormley’s art, through binoculars is a two edged sword. While welcome, in a sense it both brought attention and a full stop. I’d love to know your thought-run on the last Lowry bit. It seems an important denouement.

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    Thank you for your thoughts on this Nigel. The piece came about after a marathon session of listening to The Fall following Mark E Smith’s death. (He was a poet in music) The title comes from one of their songs. Hit The North Part 1. As you say the piece is a reflection of the stereotypical image of the North of England and how selected pieces of art are used to confirm those stereotypes. The poem was written from a poets viewpoint and the Lowry bit is an attempt to take us beyond Lowry’s paintings and their image and illustrate there is more to life in the North. The reference, paper to art, is an analogy of this, with art representing life. The mindset being beyond the stereotype there is an honesty and beauty. I think sometimes this is something that scares the establishment. As artists we can move beyond these boundaries and help to give a true understanding of the art and images portrayed. Hope this makes sense. I think my ghost writer Mal Bec had a hand in this one.

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      I totally get it Davy, and agree entirely. I’ve already started looking into Lowry more. I don’t think a lot of Northerners help themselves. Andy made the point of a kind of ‘inverse snobbery’ exists at times a ‘not for the likes of us’ mentality. I just read that Bury council bought a Lowry for £150 and sold it for £1.2 million, losing it for the town. Lowry has been accused by the establishment for being a ‘naïve, Sunday’ painter in the past, and I wonder if it was for the reasons you mention. Vettriano is another, popular with the masses, posters everywhere, childhood poverty in Glasgow, self-taught artist, bound to piss-off the ivory towers. One critic did comment about a large famous gallery who trashed his most famous piece ‘ probably cos’ they couldn’t afford it!’

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      Interesting to read about this Nigel. You are right about some Northern artists and sometimes I think they play on the stereotype to get noticed. It also makes me laugh when you read about The Northern Powerhouse being led by die in the wool Northerners like George Osborne. It seems profit and wealth mean more than history and culture these days.

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I don’t know/understand the references, but this reads beautifully.

AND I know that you turn paper and blank computer pages into art with your poems and writing and photos, Davy! 🙂

HUGS!!! 🙂
(HA! My fingers typed “JIGS” and I had to correct it! 😀 Hmm…maybe I should have left that and encouraged you to do a bit of dancing today! 😉 😀 )

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I don’t know the history of this but especially love last 4 lines about “breathing through pens & turning paper to art.” Nice.

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This is so cinematic. You have given me a very strong visual, Davy. Beautiful lines flowing eloquently. I saw through the binoculars as I read. Your pen is fluid like the sea.

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I don’t know the history of the place but the visual draws me in to learn more. Well done, Davy.

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