Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 5th of February 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

The theme for February is love and what better way to start than with the poem regarded as one of the greatest love poems of all time, William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18. Four hundred years later Shakespeare’s sonnets are still surrounded by mystery and intrigue and maybe Shakespeare presented them to the world as puzzles which were never meant to be solved.

Apologies, in advance, but due to gremlins in the studio equipment the sound quality of the recording is lower than usual. Hopefully this will be rectified by next week.

If you have problems listening to the programme, a text version of Sonnet 18 is included after the sound bar.

To hear this week’s Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Sonnet 18.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st;

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

 

William Shakespeare.

 

 

Snowflakes and Poetry

Snowflakes and Poetry

Image: Canva.com

We are in the grip of winter here in the UK and my Thursday Thoughts this week are filled with ice and snowflakes. Not snowflakes falling out of the sky, but rather the term used to characterise young adults of the 2010s who, in certain quarters, are viewed as being more prone to taking offence and less resilient than previous generations.

It appears the UK Government is pushing British youth to its limits and forcing them to learn poems by heart for examinations. The trauma such, a petition containing 160,000 names has been collected and asks for the practice to stop, allowing students to take text books containing the poems into examinations. The number of names on the petition means the matter must be raised and debated in Parliament. According to the report in the Daily Mail, the poems causing the most consternation are The Charge Of The Light Brigade, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Follower by Seamus Heaney.

The main crux of the argument centres around a task of learning 15 poems with a minimum of 300 lines of poetry and then being able to analyse them under exam conditions. Petitioners think this is too much. Isn’t one of the joys of poetry in the learning and reciting? There is no better feeling than reciting a poem from memory as it takes you into the heart and soul of the poem.

I remember at the age of 10 being given a school task to choose and memorise a piece of poetry. Being one for a challenge, I selected William Shakespeare’s All The Worlds A Stage, the monologue recited by Jacques in As You Like it. It was a struggle, but I can still capture the feeling of pride standing in front of my parents, teachers and class mates, reciting it word for word; although the lads at the rugby club kept me at arm’s length for a few weeks after.

Recent research by the University of Cambridge has found learning a poem by heart can be good for you and supports my view about getting to the heart of a poem. One of the authors of the study, Dr. Debbie Pullinger, said “Yes, it does seem that there is something special about committing a poem to memory. You’ve invested in it and made it yours. Learning, giving voice and understanding – these all go hand in hand.” The research also found learning a poem by heart had benefits for well-being and “having the potential to enrich lives over many years.”

What are your thoughts on this? Do you think the practice of learning poems verbatim for examinations is outdated and not necessary in this technological age? Maybe you have a story to share about a poem, or poems, you have learned by heart and how they had a positive impact for you.  Whatever your thoughts I would love you to share them.

Sometimes

Sometimes 2018

The Backside Of The Night

The Backside of the night 2018

Poetic Motivations:78

Poetic Motivations_78

Night Pigs

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 29th of January 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

Changes in climate and a rapid urbanisation programme across the South of England are reducing the numbers of hedgehogs and destroying their natural habitat. In this episode of Poetic Beats, we look at Davy D’s poem Night Pigs, a poem describing a night visit to his garden by hedgehogs, and discuss some of the issues facing the hedgehog and its surroundings.

If you have difficulty listening to the programme, a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this week’s Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Night Pigs

 

Dark eyes and snouts appear

from the rustling undergrowth.

Two slick backed spinal wigs

illuminated by garden light.

 

The Night Pigs emerge

snuffle by snuffle,

legs purposeful in a

midnight dad dance,

advancing on a prey

not designed for resistance.

 

Tiddles stands guard,

miffed, but pain

and experience taught

him the pecking order.

 

In perfect harmony

they trough the cat food,

each mouthful broken by

a glance for enemies,

the occasional stand down

to hoover surrounding debris.

 

The pendulum’s swing slows time,

until empty bowls

signal a sprint back

into the bosom

of the willow,

a final rustle their

thanks, and goodbyes.

 

Soon, Winter will be upon them

and who knows

how long they will sleep?

 

© Davy D 2018

 

 

 

 

Poet in Radio Shocker

Davy D Hijacks the Radio

Warning the following post contains some shameful advertising.

There hasn’t been much thinking going on this week because I have spent most of it in a wild state of panic.

Visitors to this blog will know over the last six months I have become a bit of a diva / luvvie and  taken Inside the Mind of Davy D onto the airwaves, with the Poetic Beats project on my local radio station. Well, guess what?……… they have only let me take over the radio station completely for two hours this Saturday.  I REPEAT….. they have only let me take over the radio station for two hours this Saturday. I know, it’s bonkers, on a par with Donald Trump taking over the Whitehouse.

The past week has been devoted to fine tuning my favourite poems and selecting some of my all-time favourite songs creating a mixture of excitement and full on fear in the Davy D household. Mrs D and the fish have moved into the garden shed and are refusing to return until it’s all over.

There will be a Will-i-am fest with poems from William Wordsworth, William Blake and William Butler Yeats, with a few Davy D rhymes thrown in, backed by some excellent tracks (I would say that wouldn’t I?)

So why not come and join me this Saturday, the 3rd of February, between 12.00pm and 14.00pm GMT. I know most of you are outside the reception area, but you can get it on the internet by following this link at Red Kite Radio.

Please tune in, the radio studio can be a lonely place.

Cities

Cities V2

Goggled

Goggled v2

Poetic Motivations:77

Poetic Motivations_77