Japan

Spring Haiku

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 26th March 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

In this episode we take a trip over to Japan and examine a form of poetry that has caused much debate in the poetry world, the Haiku.  The Japanese Haiku Master Matsuo Basho spent a lifetime travelling and mastering the form we see and value today.  Davy D’s poem, Spring Haiku reflects the spirit of haiku poetry and written using the Western style of the format.

Poetic Beats is taking a break for a few weeks and will back on Friday the 27th of April 2018.

If you have difficulty listening to the broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Spring Haiku.

 

To the untrained eye

The haiku masks with its form

And simplicity.

 

Three lines from “The Now”

a key enabling nature’s

box to be opened.

 

Take Spring for instance.

A winter beast ushered back

To hibernation.

 

Dawn sunlight falling

On the Ridgeway, bringing a

Spine to daffodils.

 

Deep undercover,

the heron set in stillness,

waiting for movement,

 

distracted only

by mirrored ripples and duck’s

chaotic landings.

 

 

And in the distance

Rooked woodlands calling out to

the shadowed walker.

 

It’s mysterious

The paths we will walk and the

Poems we will write

 

And read, hoping to

uncover answers to life

and her quandaries.

 

© Davy D 2018

 

Coffee With Basho

Coffee with Basho

When times are tough or when things start to darken your soul, do you have a favourite poem or poet you like to retreat to? The work of Japanese Haiku Master, Basho, provides a bolthole for me on such occasions, and recent events in the UK have led me to revisit his poetry.

In his sketch, The Records of a Travel- Worn Satchel, Basho advocated “all who achieve greatness in art possess one thing in common………. they are one with nature.” He spent his time travelling alone around Japan and getting closer to nature. He found the solitude (shabi) helped to block out distraction and enabled him to find lightness (karumi) and a spirit of poverty (wabi) to write his haiku.

Reading Basho takes you into the heart of nature, blocks out the distractions provided by a world seemingly hell bent on destroying itself. Sometimes the noise from current events provides a disconnect from our reason for being. Reconnecting with Basho has reconnected me with nature. I have experienced again, the feel of wet grass on bare feet, watched bees dancing amongst the lavender, listened to the blackbird announcing the dawn.

Basho’s work reminds us that the awe and simplicity of nature will always shine a light in the darkness.

What poems or poets provide an escape for you? I would love to hear about them.

Why not pop over to the Go Dog Go Café. I’ve taken Basho’s poetry over there and there’s coffee and a café haiku going on.