Spring

Spring Haiku

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 26th March 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

In this episode we take a trip over to Japan and examine a form of poetry that has caused much debate in the poetry world, the Haiku.  The Japanese Haiku Master Matsuo Basho spent a lifetime travelling and mastering the form we see and value today.  Davy D’s poem, Spring Haiku reflects the spirit of haiku poetry and written using the Western style of the format.

Poetic Beats is taking a break for a few weeks and will back on Friday the 27th of April 2018.

If you have difficulty listening to the broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this recording of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

Spring Haiku.

 

To the untrained eye

The haiku masks with its form

And simplicity.

 

Three lines from “The Now”

a key enabling nature’s

box to be opened.

 

Take Spring for instance.

A winter beast ushered back

To hibernation.

 

Dawn sunlight falling

On the Ridgeway, bringing a

Spine to daffodils.

 

Deep undercover,

the heron set in stillness,

waiting for movement,

 

distracted only

by mirrored ripples and duck’s

chaotic landings.

 

 

And in the distance

Rooked woodlands calling out to

the shadowed walker.

 

It’s mysterious

The paths we will walk and the

Poems we will write

 

And read, hoping to

uncover answers to life

and her quandaries.

 

© Davy D 2018

 

The First Spring Day

Poetic Beats

Welcome to this week’s Poetic Beats with Howard Bond and Davy D, recorded on the 19th March 2018 on Red Kite Radio.

On the last day of astronomical Winter, and the eve of Spring and the Vernal (Spring) Equinox, we read and examine the poem, The First Spring Day by Christina Rossetti.

The Spring Equinox has long been celebrated as a time of rebirth in the Northern Hemisphere and there are many festivals welcoming the first day of Spring. In Iran, the equinox marks the start of Nowruz, the Persian New Year, and the festival of Khooneh Takouni, (shaking the house down), where two weeks of spring cleaning gets the new year underway.

If you have difficulty listening to the broadcast a text version of the poem is included after the sound bar.

To hear this week’s episode of Poetic Beats please press the arrow to the left of the sound bar below.

 

 

 

The First Spring Day

 

I wonder if the sap is stirring yet,

If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate,

If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun

And crocus fires are kindling one by one:

        Sing, robin, sing!

I still am sore in doubt concerning Spring.

 

I wonder if the spring-tide of this year

Will bring another Spring both lost and dear;

If heart and spirit will find out their Spring,

Or if the world alone will bud and sing:

        Sing, hope, to me!

Sweet notes, my hope, soft notes for memory.

 

The sap will surely quicken soon or late,

The tardiest bird will twitter to a mate;

So Spring must dawn again with warmth and bloom,

Or in this world, or in the world to come:

        Sing, voice of Spring!

Till I too blossom and rejoice and sing.

 

Christina Rossetti

#BeastFromTheEast

Beast From the East

It’s the first day of calendar Spring and the UK is in crisis. I’m not talking about Brexit, it is much more serious. We are in the grip of a visit from The Beast From The East. Schools have been closed, flights and train journeys cancelled and there have been reports of hand to hand fighting in supermarkets as traumatised Brits rush to stockpile food for the impending doom.

Although the slight covering of snow sitting on the grass outside of the Poetry Den have left me a little perplexed as to the hysteria, watching and listening to the news bulletins provides plenty of material for the poet.  Which brings me to the focus for today’s Thursday Thoughts, Spring Poetry.

Spring provides so much for the poet to write about. The beautiful blooms of snowdrops set against dark soil, the gold tinge of daffodil stalks about to bloom; and the sudden change of pace of the Robins, Blackbirds and Thrush in preparation for the mating season.

There have been many wonderful poems written about Spring and I thought I would share one of mine, To Spring, by William Blake. I would love you to share your favourite Spring Poem (maybe one you have written yourself) in the comments section to this post. The beast is forecast to hit our village over the next few days and I might need some uplifting Spring poetry to raise my spirits. And to accompany having to break into the emergency rations of Malbec and chocolate.

 

To Spring

 

O thou with dewy locks, who lookest down

Through the clear windows of the morning, turn

Thine angel eyes upon our western isle,

Which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring!

 

The hills tell one another, and the listening

Valleys hear; all our longing eyes are turn’d

Up to thy bright pavilions: issue forth

And let thy holy feet visit our clime!

 

Come o’er the eastern hills, and let our winds

Kiss thy perfumèd garments; let us taste

Thy morn and evening breath; scatter thy pearls

Upon our lovesick land that mourns for thee.

 

O deck her forth with thy fair fingers; pour

Thy soft kisses on her bosom; and put

Thy golden crown upon her languish’d head,

Whose modest tresses are bound up for thee.

 

William Blake.